UBM Medica US Editorial Policies

We provide fair, balanced and insightful content to our audiences. And we want to be as transparent as possible about what we do.

I personally welcome your reactions, questions or comments on any given project, piece of editorial, or policy:

Sara Michael

Sara Michael
VP, Content and Strategy, UBM Medica US
sara.michael@ubm.com
410-818-2717
410-206-4680 (cell)

Here are some of the basic policies we follow.

Advertising and Sponsored Resources

We believe that the future of medical practice and the integrity of our brands rely on full transparency regarding how and whether commerce has influenced editorial.

Ads: UBM Medica US products usually include advertisements. That's our core business model. Otherwise, we couldn't offer our content to physicians and other readers without asking them to pay for it.

However, the fact that we run ads does not mean editorial is influenced by advertisers. We do not use content submitted by advertisers, by pharmaceutical companies, or by advertising agencies as editorial except where specifically labeled as such; we don't take a position on whether a product is good or bad.

Our authors, editors and writers serve the audience first, foremost and fully.

Sponsored resources: Sometimes, companies pay us to create educational content that supports their goals. If a vendor had a say in our content, you'll always know it.

Our editors strive to make content within a sponsored resource relevant and accurate, but sponsored resources are produced outside our journals' standard editorial processes. The sponsor typically decides what topics are covered and may review and approve the final product. Note, however, that all sponsored content undergoes editorial or independent peer review (as per the norm for the publication or site in question) to ensure the accuracy of the content.

Examples of sponsored resources include a white paper on the benefits of a particular type of software (without endorsing a specific brand), or a research project on physicians' views toward a particular subject.

Such projects will always prominently state that the content was created with financial support, will name the financial supporter, and will include a disclaimer that the supporter influenced the content, as follows:

This resource is sponsored exclusively by [Company X]. It was created in consultation with [Company X] by the editors of [journal/site] in a manner consistent with [journal/site]'s editorial policies for ethics and quality. Company X reviewed the material prior to publication. Final decisions on editorial content were made by the editors of [journal/site].

When promotional content provided by a sponsor is included, we add to the above disclaimer:

Contains promotional content. The editorial board of [the publication/site] did not review the content provided by the sponsor.

If we e-mail or otherwise use promotional or educational content straight from a vendor, we'll also make it clear that it's an ad or sponsor-provided material.

Journalistic Ethics

UBM has an internal policy on journalistic ethics.

Here are some key points from that document:

User-Generated Content/Comments

UBM staff aren't the only ones who put content on our sites, of course; we invite the community we serve to contribute. In fact, user comments, forums, and the like are a key part of keeping content balanced. If we get something wrong, you can go ahead and correct it or provide another point of view.

When users comment on the site, they have to adhere to our terms of service. This document doesn't replace those terms, but it's a good spot to elaborate and call out a few main points and expectations.

  1. Comments can't libel someone and shouldn't be a place for personal attacks. These sites are about solutions and discussions, not yelling.
  2. Our sites are for physicians and their professional community. It's not an appropriate place for patients to ask for healthcare advice. On most of our sites, only physicians and other professional providers can comment.
  3. Comments are also not a place to run thinly disguised ads. If a site allows non-physicians, such as vendor representatives to comment, we're looking for comments that contribute to the conversation, not pitches.
  4. Nobody should violate patient privacy by revealing personal health information in any kind of contributed content. Please be circumspect about revealing any personal health information in any kind of contributed content that might make it possible for a patient to be identified, such as faces.
  5. In some instances, we might pay users to contribute to our sites.

In short, in a confusing media world, we're doing our very best to hew to high standards and full transparency about what we do.

Think we're not? I want to hear about it.

Rev. 1/2012